A Year of Miracles — 1776

by Mark Skousen on August 2, 2002

Personal Snapshots
Forecasts & Strategies
August 2002

“The cause of America is in great measure the cause of all mankind.”

— Tom Paine, Common Sense (1776)

A Year of Miracles

Like most Americans, I’ve always been fascinated by the events of 1776. It was a year of earth-shattering events that transformed forever the Western world.

It is, of course, the year the American colonies broke off relations with the Mother Country, declared political independence from monarchy, and established the words of Thomas Jefferson that “all men are born equal” and endowed with certain “inalienable rights.”

It is the year that Adam Smith’s monumental Wealth of Nations was published, a powerful declaration of economic independence. Smith proclaimed the establishment of a “system of natural liberty” and the “invisible hand” doctrine that private enterprise would benefit the public wealth.

It is the year the eminent British historian Edward Gibbon published the first volume of his classic history, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. It was considered a scandalous book because it blamed the decline and fall of Rome after it adopted Christianity as its state religion. Through his review of the Roman world, Gibbon emphasized the principles of “liberty, virtue and courage.”

Last but not least, 1776 is the year Thomas Paine’s Common Sense was printed, and Paine, more than any other revolutionary figure, symbolized the Age of Enlightenment. Paine’s philosophy encompassed the entire compass of liberty. He was a radical who advanced democratic emancipation, individual rights, religious tolerance and competitive capitalism.

Just as Adam Smith, Thomas Jefferson, Edward Gibbon and Tom Paine were radicals of their day, so the Foundation for Economic Education and its supporters are the radicals of our day, supporting maximum political, economic and religious freedom.

 

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